after closet

Photo: David Tsay

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The Result
Once you've designated a clear purpose for a space, Walsh believes you must make it inviting, to encourage use. He rips down Bridgewater's curtain, which he says allows her to fall into "the out-of-sight-out-of-mind trap." Instead, he's brought along an inexpensive slab of fiberboard covered with fabric; here Bridgewater can tack invites for weddings and industry events. A pair of stacked mail trays from organize.com, meanwhile, will be for bills that require attention and DGA paperwork that needs to be filed in dated binders (older binders will live in boxes in her closet). A filing cabinet under the desk will store personal paperwork like insurance claims. When Walsh rolls up a bright red chair, Bridgewater is thrilled. "Now I have a station dedicated to work," she says. "As opposed to this awkward area that embarrasses me every time I walk by."

Next: Two more weird-space makeovers
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