Barton Brooks and friends
The fact that the hot debate surrounding the impact of one individual's generous actions—the age-old question: "Can one person really make a difference?"—still has two polar sides continues to boggle my mind. Leading the debate is an antagonistic group of committed dissidents, who, as it seems, have nothing better to do than idly hurl insults into the open minds of those in possession of a more altruistic perspective.

This baffling dispute draws to mind one of my favorite quotes: "Cynics will shake their heads, but cynics don't do much anyways but shake their heads." Could I think of something better for them to do? Just ask me! If you think stymieing the intentions of one person seeking no more than to put a smile on the face of a 5-year-old AIDS orphan is a valuable use of time—we've got problems.

In my mind, if you've change one life, you've changed the world.

Even if you see the benefit in amassing individual efforts, there's still the trap of self-doubt to contend with. How many missed opportunities to effect change have passed by with the sheepishly uttered excuse of: "I don't know where to start"? When I'm posed with that challenge, I have a simple, two-word reply—guerrilla aid.

Guerrilla aid is a style of volunteerism that I define with the mantra behind my work: "Just go somewhere, do something and teach others to do the same." Regardless of the amount of time you have to offer, zeros on your paycheck or previous working knowledge of international aid—you can make a difference!

The perfect place to begin developing your own international aid project is on a vacation! If you need a bit of help getting started, we follow a travel template at Global Colors that presents some basic steps you can take to make a difference during your vacation.

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