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The Internet can sometimes seem like the Wild West for child predators—a place that largely operates outside the law. While trading in pedophile pornography is illegal, lack of adequate funding means law enforcement officials are able to investigate just 2 percent of their leads. And, according to Interpol statistics, only one-half of 1 percent are ever prosecuted.

"What you are going to see is going to shock you to the core, but I'm asking you to please don't turn away," Oprah says, "because this is happening in our country to our children in the United States every day."

The map behind Oprah shows how quickly one pornographic image of a child being molested can spread. It starts with the large red dot from a computer in Washington, D.C. Within 24 hours, it has spread all across the United States—from coast to coast and north to south. "This is just an average day in America—24 hours," Oprah says.

The demand for new videos and photos is so high that authorities report tracking increasingly brutal pornography with younger and younger victims.

"For once, you and I can do something about it!" Oprah says.

Find out how to write to your senators to urge them to pass legislation to fight online predators.
FROM: Internet Predators: How Bad Is It?
Published on September 15, 2008


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