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President Johnson-Sirleaf says education is foremost on her agenda, particularly for girls. "In our country, much of Africa, the girls get left behind," she says. "The boys are seen as the ones that will be the power brokers, the ones that will be the professionals. Girls get married very early and so the emphasis will have to be on the girl child. And so we're trying to respond to that, make sure we get programs that will support girls' education."

One of the greatest challenges President Johnson-Sirleaf says she faces is building schools. "We can't do it with the resources the country has, we have to just be progressive—work at it," she says. "We've got partners in the country, some other donor countries that work with us. The U.S. is one of those that are working with us. The European commission is working with us. We're trying to expand the partnerships."
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FROM: Meet the World's Youngest Queen
Published on May 17, 2006

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