Valerie Monroe
Tweeze after a warm shower or bath, if you can; the steam softens the hair follicles, making hair easier to remove. Natural light is the best for seeing fine hairs, says Anastasia, the celebrity brow expert. (I take a little magnifying mirror over to the window. And when I'm through tweezing, I put that little mirror right back under the sink so I don't terrify myself with a random peek when I'm unprepared for it.) Starting at the inner part of the eyebrow and working out toward the temple, tweeze any strays in the direction of hair growth. When you're finished, apply some witch hazel or aloe vera gel to soothe the area.

Tweezers get dull from excessive use, or from using them for purposes other than eyebrow shaping, says Sania Vucetaj, owner of Sania's Brow Bar in New York City. So if you're using yours to open soda cans, quit it (or buy another pair for your grooming needs). Sania likes the Tweezerman slant tip tweezer ($20) because it's precise and lasts a couple of years. Anastasia (naturally) likes her own slant tip tweezers ($28); she says the angle makes it easier to tweeze on the browbone than needlepoint tweezers, which can pinch or puncture the skin around the eyes.

Bottom Line: Have your brows shaped by an expert first, then tweeze only the strays after a shower; and don't use your tweezers as a household tool.