Paced breathing
Photo: Pixland/Thinkstock
PAGE 6
Try out one or more of the following suggestions, and then enjoy the "beauty bonus" that results:

If you're feeling anxious, you may be breathing fast and shallowly or even holding your breath altogether. Get into the habit of stopping for a few minutes to concentrate on taking slow, deep breaths; it's a no-fail way to calm both your body and your mind.

Sit quietly somewhere and just become conscious of how you're breathing. The idea is to slow down to about 5 or 6 breaths a minute (the usual is about 15). Inhale deeply, using your diaphragm and pushing out your abdomen. Hold it for a few counts (but not so long that it makes you dizzy), and then very slowly let out the air. Studies have shown that this kind of breathing lowers your blood pressure and is beneficial to your health in many other ways—not the least of which is that it stimulates the flow of lymphatic fluid through your body, which in turn boosts your immune system.

I use this method before my QVC broadcasts. Along with breathing, I do a visualization in which I picture the world. Then, when I'm looking into the camera, I imagine sending out a cloud of love and protection to surround the planet. And I have to tell you, there were times at QVC when I was so nervous because I knew that on live TV you can't make a mistake and you have to perform. But once I discovered this technique, it really helped calm me.

Watch a yoga instructor demonstrate the basics of breath.

Beauty bonus: As well as getting you to relax, deep breathing affects blood circulation and the oxygenation of your cells, including those in your skin. And all cells need a steady stream of oxygen to keep them alive, deliver nutrition, and do their job properly.

NEXT STORY

Comment

LONG FORM
ONE WORD