burnout clock
Illustration: Holly Lindem
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How to Chill Out


Research burnout on the Internet, and you'll find a trove of helpful hints like "Learn to manage stress!" and "Live life in balance!" This is like hearing a financial manager tell you, "Have several million dollars!" In contrast, authors like Hanley offer wonderfully detailed instructions. Of course, when you're burned out it's hard to read a shampoo bottle, let alone a book. The following abridged advice may help cool the burn.

Chill Principle 1: Become a grazer.

Since burnout often includes weight gain, many people try to eat less as stress levels climb. Yet going hungry can itself be very stressful. And feeding a body infrequently creates the alarm state that encourages fat storage. The solution: Eat more. I don't mean doughnuts and lattes, though. I mean low-calorie green food that you eat throughout the entire day. Adding food with lots of antioxidants, water, fiber, and other nutrients can calm you and help your body relax. (I favor smoothies made from fruit and leafy veggies—tastier than they sound.) In addition, take daily omega-3 supplements such as fish oil. These healthy substances reduce inflammation, the physiological part of the "flame" that's burning you out.

Chill Principle 2: Sleep as if your life depends on it.

Some people feel superior when they work around the clock. This is like proudly pouring Tabasco sauce in your eyes. Sleep makes you smarter, better-looking, more creative. It can add years to your life. It does more to improve the long-term quality of that life than money, fancy vacations, or hot sex. Not giving high priority to sleep is, frankly, insane.

Because our culture doesn't teach this, many people feel they don't have time to sleep. There are certainly days, even weeks, when this is true. But when sleep deprivation drags into months or years, we're making choices that sustain it. Because I've been all the way to burnout, I've become vigilant about getting enough sleep—and I started when I was unemployed and in debt. Exert every ounce of your will and ingenuity to do the same. Hire someone to help with the kids, even if it means living in a smaller house. Refuse to work for bosses who expect frequent all-nighters. Don't take on tasks that disallow sleep, any more than you'd say yes to a job that deprives you of oxygen.

For "driven" patients, Hanley suggests six to eight hours of sleep each night, with naps as needed. For "dragging" patients: eight hours a night, with one period of relaxation during the day (sitting somewhere quiet, even in a restroom stall, for ten to 15 minutes). If you're "losing it," you need eight hours of sleep plus two ten- to 15-minute relaxation breaks. "Hitting the wall" means eight to nine hours each night, plus two breaks. And once you're "burned out," you need eight to ten hours of sleep, plus three 15- to 30-minute naps or retreats. Ignore these minimums, and your body will eventually end up lying still anyway—in your bed, a hospital, or the morgue. You choose.

Chill Principle 3: Exercise for fun.

Almost no one ever tells you to exercise less, but if you're burned out, you should. I fried myself into chronic pain by forcing workouts when my whole body wanted to rest. Ironically, when I began exercising less, I got leaner and fitter. Some exercise helps prevent burnout, but too much, at the wrong time, only turns up the heat.

If you're "driven," aim for an hour of vigorous exercise three to five times per week. "Dragging" folks should limit hard exercise to one hour three times a week, or one to three sessions of moderate activity like light yoga. If you're "losing it," do three gentle hours a week. "Hitting the wall" calls for 30 gentle minutes one to three times a week. If you're totally "burned out," roll over in bed occasionally until you're stronger.

The key to gauging how much you should exercise is a mysterious thing called fun, which you may remember from childhood. While exercising, ask yourself, Is this fun? If running isn't fun, walk. If walking isn't fun, sit. If even that feels wearisome, take a nap. Your body-mind fun barometer is sophisticated and accurate. Use it.
As a reminder, always consult your doctor for medical advice and treatment before starting any program.

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