journaling
Who am I? It's a lifelong question. It's not about labels—"I'm a mom," or "I'm a good employee", or "I'm a Christian." It's, "When I was born, what was the plan for my life?"

Dr. Robin suggests writing in your discovery journal every night. Concentrate on moving beyond labels and appearances.

"If you work on the question—Who am I?—every day you'll start recognizing that this is the very question you've been avoiding," Dr. Robin says, even if you only write, "I don't know."

Prior to starting this journal, you've stopped yourself from feeling. This is about getting those feelings to return. It's going to be a struggle and confusing to really start pondering, "Who am I?" but don't minimize what could happen if you make a commitment every night to be writing something about who you are.

The "Who Am I?" Journal does not need to be exclusively about your failures, mistakes and missteps. Keep in mind good things about yourself that will balance your answer to the essential question in your journal.

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