closeup of woman getting hair colored
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7. Be a little dolled up.
Arrive wearing your usual makeup. "Your everyday blush or bronzer may change the tone of your complexion, and that will affect the haircolor that's best for you," says Marie Robinson, owner of the Marie Robinson Salon in New York City.

8. Talk time (and money).
"If you only want to come back every four months, speak up," says Sharon Dorram, cofounder of Sharon Dorram Color at Sally Hershberger salon in New York City. "A colorist can find a shade that works with your skin tone and your schedule."

9. Raise the subject of your brows.
If you're making a dramatic change, ask the colorist if your brows need attention, too, says Laura Coleman, color director for the Red Door Spa in Chicago. A shade tweak—usually a subtle lightening—can be done at the salon in minutes.

10. Offer full disclosure.
Give your colorist as much information as possible about your hair, says Robinson. A few things worth addressing:

Have you had a relaxer or a perm? Even if it was two years ago, it could affect the way your hair responds to color.

How often do you change your haircolor?

Does your hair tend to break?

Have you experienced any hair loss?

Have you ever had an allergic reaction to haircolor, or do you have sensitive skin?

Next: What you need to know to get a knockout department store makeover


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