rage reducers

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The "It May Take Awhile" Reducer
You admit it: These days, everything infuriates you. Litterers, loudmouths and long lines. Stories of how men are pigs. People looking at you on the subway. Celebs with diet books and empty sound bites. Our culture is falling apart. Everyone else seems so infuriatingly cheerful and complacent. Not you. You’re furious all the time.

Reducer: You may not be as angry as you think—that’s the upshot of a study led by Emre Demiralp, a neuroscientist at the University of Michigan. Compared to healthy people, the clinically depressed couldn’t distinguish deep despair from anger in everyday life. If you're one of them, you might snap unfairly at your friend, and then feel angrier instead of ashamed when she starts to cry. What else is going on—shame, guilt or some other emotion? If you can’t tell, you need a professional to help you sort it out. Okay, as a rage reducer, therapy isn’t an instant fix. But learning what else is mixed in with your anger is the first step in surviving in what—we agree—can be an infuriating world.

Next: 8 steps to conquer the beast within
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