How to deal with difficult people
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Having identified the type you are dealing with, don't do what doesn't work:

  • Clinging types cannot be handled with avoidance. They are like Velcro and will stick to you every time you get close. They ignore a polite no, but you can't use direct rejection without making an enemy. Neutrality hurts their feelings and makes them feel insecure.
  • Controlling types won't back down if you show them concrete evidence that you are right and they are wrong. They don't care about facts, only about being right. If they are perfectionists, you can't handle them simply by doing a better job. There's always going to be something to criticize.
  • Competitive types can't be pacified by pleading. Any sign of emotion is like a red flag to a bull. They take your tears as a sign of weakness and charge even harder. They want to go in for the kill, even when you beg them not to. If you stand your ground and try to win, they will most likely jump ship and abandon you.
Because these behaviors don't work, what does?

  • Clinging types can be handled by showing them how to deal with situations on their own. Give them responsibility. Instead of doing what they want, show them how to do it. This works with children, and clinging types are children who have never grown up (which is why they often seem so infantile). If they try the gambit of saying that you do the job so much better, reply that you don't. The stronger and more capable you act, the more they will cling. Finally, find situations where you can honestly say, "I need your help." They will either come through or walk away. You will probably be happy either way.
  • Controlling types can be handled by acting unintimidated. At heart, controlling types fear they are inadequate, and they defend against their own insecurity by making other people feel insecure and not good enough. Show you are good enough. When you do a good job, say so and don't fall for their insistence on constant changes. Be strong and stand up for yourself. Above all, don't turn an encounter into a contest of who's right and who's wrong—you'll never outplay a controlling type at his or her own game.
  • Competitive types are handled by letting them win. Until they win, they won't have a chance to show generosity. Most competitive types want to be generous; it improves their self-image, and competitive types never lose sight of their self-image. If you have a strong disagreement, never show emotion or ask for mercy. Instead, make a reasonable argument. If the discussion is based on facts, competitive types have a way to back down without losing. (For example, instead of saying "I'm too tired to do this. It's late, and you're being unfair," say "I need more research time on this, and I will get it to you faster if I am fresh in the morning.")
What to do when you cannot handle difficult people

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