Overwhelmed woman

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1.
Between work, raising children, managing household chores and taking time for yourself, your everyday life can easily leave you overwhelmed and exhausted. Leo Babauta, author of The Power of Less, offers seven steps to quickly de-stress your life.
Woman focused on breathing

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2. Breathe Deeply
Concentrate on your breathing for five breaths, Leo says. "If you're feeling stressed, close your eyes and focus on each breath as it comes in and then goes out," he says. "Focus on the breathing and let any other thoughts drift away."
Woman walking

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3. Take a Walk
Getting up and moving around gets your blood flowing and calms you, Leo says. Try walking around your office building or going outside for 10 minutes to get some fresh air.
Women on laptop

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4. Focus on One Thing
Instead of trying to do everything at once and multitasking, learn to do one task at a time, Leo says. "It's less stressful and more effective," he says.
Woman thinking

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5. Choose 3 Tasks
Instead of trying to tackle a laundry list of tasks and projects, pick the three very important tasks that you want to accomplish today, Leo says. "Focus on doing those before anything else," he says.
Woman with PDA

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6. Simplify Your Schedule
If your schedule is packed with appointments, meetings and tasks, it's stressful, Leo says. "Try to schedule less, which means getting out of less important commitments," he says. "Leave space to breathe."
Woman reading

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7. Take Time for Important Things
Whether it's spending time with family, exercising, reading, pursuing something you're passionate about or just taking some quiet time, put it on your schedule and make it an unmissable appointment, Leo says.
Woman with raised arms

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8. Live in the Moment
Worrying about what might happen or replaying things that have already happened are stressful ways of thinking, Leo says. "Instead, focus on what is happening now," he says. Practice in five- to 10-minute intervals at first, and you'll begin to improve, Leo says.

More ways to manage your stress
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