Sit down with friends and family and take some time to be a kid again. With minimal supplies, you can create a unique piece of art and give it to someone as a gift. If creating art is not your thing, then support the people who do love it by visiting a museum, donating art supplies, buying art from a local artist, or writing a letter to the people who control the school budgets. Just as there are many ways you can express art, there are also many ways you can support and appreciate it.

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  1. Create an original piece of art today. If you don’t know how or where to start, visit your local craft store and ask for help.
  2. Sign up for an art class with a friend.
  3. Visit a local museum, art gallery, or sculpture garden.
  4. Volunteer to support an art activity at a local school or senior citizen program.
  5. Communicate with your school-district administrators or national legislators by either writing a letter of appreciation for current funding or requesting funding for the arts. Find and contact your federal, state, and local officials.


  • 93% of people believe that the arts are vital to a well-rounded education.
  • Regardless, only 29% of schools have been able to maintain time and funding for arts programs.
  • Children spend more time at their locker than in art classes.
  • People learn to be more tolerant and open when creating or appreciating art.
  • Art promotes individuality, bolsters self-confidence, and improves overall academic performance.
  • Art is a reflection of people and cultures since the beginning of time.
  • Students who take 4 years of arts and music in high school score over 98 points higher on their SATs than students who took only a half year or less.

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