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Dr. Welner also acts as a consultant for ABC. When asked what he thinks that network would do if it received the tape, he says, "I think the networks would have aired it, and they know it. But that doesn't change anything. It's still wrong. And it's wrong for NBC to say now that they'd do it again. The networks are capable of making mistakes. They've made a grievous mistake. They have to own up to it," he says. "The issue is not an issue of blame. The issue is what can we learn from this going forward."

While he says the information could be made available to people with a specific interest—such as the victims' parents—Dr. Welner says public discussion can be carried on without these images.

"If people have access to it and are flooded with it and are desensitized, people will be inspired by this," he says. "Because what it represents is immortality, strength, toughness to a person who has none, and it gives a person on the fringe someone to identify with and someone who has power and empowered himself against society."
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FROM: The Virginia Tech Videotape Controversy
Published on January 01, 2006

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