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Nadya: When I was little, my mother said, "Nadya, go make me some money." People are approaching her, all the time, for modeling, acting. I said, "No, Mom. I didn't want anything to do with that stuff." My dad [was telling me], "Education, Nadya. That [other] stuff is phony. You don’t want anything to do with it. You go to school—that is the one thing you're going to have for the rest of your life. No one will take it away from you." I gravitate toward my dad. I want to mind my own business, become a psychiatrist.

Suze: That doesn't have to do with anything we were just talking about!

Nadya: It does. I began to associate saccharine-ness, phoney-baloney stuff—like the media and Hollywood—I associate it with a mom who I desperately sought approval from. On one side, I do want people to like me. I do care what people think because, in a way, I'm seeking approval from women to compensate for never feeling approved or liked by my own mother. On the other side, I’m hiding from the cameras and the fame because my mom wanted me to do that. Dad didn't, so we've got a complicated issue.

...

Oprah: My heart goes out to you. It really does. And I don’t care how much you’ve been villainized or how much people have judged you. What I feel in my heart is that your children deserve a chance.

Nadya: They do.

Oprah: Your children deserve a chance just like every child in the world—in this country and beyond our country—deserves a chance. And so I don’t think your children should be, you know, held in low esteem or villainized because of something that you did. Here is your one chance—because we’re rooting for you. I will go on national television and say I’m rooting for you, I want you to do well. But can you answer the question? Because there is a perception in the country that you were seeking attention. ... You know, you’re a pretty woman who looks like you might have had some work done, and I don’t know if you did or not.

Nadya: No surgery.

Oprah: But the perception when people see that...because all of [us] know work costs money. And the perception is that you are liking it—that all this somehow feels okay to you, that you’re seeking it in some way.
FROM: Money Powerhouse Suze Orman's Intervention with Octomom Nadya Suleman
Published on January 14, 2011

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