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Shawn Hornbeck Follow-up
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Shawn Hornbeck
In January 2007, Pam and Craig Akers and Doris and Don Ownby came to The Oprah Winfrey Show to give their very first interview after being reunited with their sons Shawn Hornbeck and Ben Ownby, who were abducted by the same man more than four years apart.

On October 6, 2002, while on his way to a friend's house, Shawn disappeared. At first, the family thought he was just running late, but after 45 minutes, Pam says she had a gut feeling that something terrible had happened. Immediately, Pam and her husband, Craig, jumped in the car and scoured their neighborhood for a sign of their son.

For four long years, Pam and Craig continued the search for Shawn. They even started a website in hope that someone may have information leading to his return. "We've always believed that there was absolutely hope that he was out there and that we would find him. That's what got us up every day," Craig said.

"I couldn't give up hope on him, and I knew the Lord knew where he was at, and if he wanted him brought back to me, that's the way it was going to happen," Pam said.
FROM: Elizabeth Smart, John Ramsey: The Stories That Captured the Nation
Published on September 10, 2008

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    Love Conquers (Almost) All
    What We Have by Amy Boesky
    Photo: Ben Goldstein/Studio D
    What We Have
    By Amy Boesky
    320 pages; Gotham


    "This story is about what it's been like for one family—mine—to live with risk," says Amy Boesky in What We Have, her memoir about being a previvor, one of the increasing number of women with cancer-ridden family histories who find themselves deciding whether to have genetic testing or preventive surgery. With bite and humor (and lighthearted allusions to 17th-century metaphysics), Boesky turns a would-be "disease memoir" into a moving account of her high-achieving clan, the women so close that they call each other by the same nickname (Mellie, an affectionate nod to Gone with the Wind). Aware of their shared biology, Boesky and her two sisters think they can control it: "Time, you couldn't do much about. Timing was different." They each decide to have their ovaries removed just as soon as they've had children. When the author and her younger sister become pregnant, they are ecstatic—but not for long. Perfect planning goes awry, and yet Boesky's loving, unsentimental portrait of these endearing women never does.

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      An Abducted Child Speaks Out
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      Shawn Hornbeck
      In January 2007, the case of Shawn Hornbeck and Ben Ownby—made headlines around the world. In what is referred to as the miracle in Missouri, both boys were found alive in the St. Louis-area home of alleged kidnapper Michael Devlin. Ben had been gone for four days; Shawn had been away from his home for more than four years.

      Devlin has pleaded not guilty to kidnapping charges filed in connection with Shawn and Ben. He has yet to enter a plea to the remaining 71 charges against him, including 69 counts of forcible sodomy.

      Since the boys were rescued, there has been debate and speculation in the press about why Shawn and Ben didn't escape when they had a chance. These questions angered many, including Todd—a man who suffered a similar fate in 1974.
      FROM: Kidnapped As a Child: Why I Didn't Run
      Published on February 21, 2007

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        Rosie O'Donnell on Life, Love and Family
        Rosie O'Donnell
        Comedian Rosie O'Donnell was once known as the "Queen of Nice." For six seasons, she was the Emmy-winning host of The Rosie O'Donnell Show, an instant hit that catapulted her from the standup stage to stardom.

        In a surprising move, Rosie ended her show in 2002 to spend more time with her family. Since then, she's traded in the "nice" title for something more authentic and, oftentimes, more controversial.

        The same year her show went off the air, Rosie came out publicly as a lesbian, and in 2004, she married longtime partner Kelli Carpenter in San Francisco. Their marriage was later annulled by the State of California.

        Rosie took time out of the spotlight to stay home with her and Kelli's four children, Parker, Chelsea, Blake and Vivienne, before returning to daytime television. When a spot opened up on The View, Rosie settled in as one of the outspoken co-hosts. Ratings soared...and so did tempers.

        After a private argument with the show's creator, TV legend Barbara Walters, and a heated, on-air debate with co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck, Rosie walked off the set in May 2007, never to return.
        PAGE 1 of 10
        FROM: Oprah Talks to Rosie O'Donnell
        Published on January 25, 2010

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          Ask Deepak: How to Find a Satisfying Job
          Each week, spiritual teacher Deepak Chopra responds to Oprah.com users' questions with enlightening advice to help them live their best lives.
          Woman looking for job
          Photo: Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock
          Q: I had the privilege of hearing you speak at the Ethical Society of St. Louis in October 2009. I have read a lot of your material and know we have to find our dharma in this life. In 35 years of working, I have been laid off—through no fault of my own—five times and now cannot seem to "attract" a job. I have to live with friends, and no matter how many applications, letters and resumes I send, nothing seems to happen. I am truly confused on what my dharma is. Others seem to have known since they were children, but I have yet to find it at this late age. Can you help? Thanks!

          — Julie H., Ballwin, Missouri

          Dear Julie,
          I deeply sympathize with your plight, which is shared today by millions of older workers. Finding your dharma doesn't have to be confined to finding a satisfying line of work. While the word "dharma" tends to be used that way in Indian society, where by tradition the family dharma passed the same kind of work from father to son, in modern America we are accustomed to the very opposite. Desiring freedom of movement and the right to change jobs frequently, conditions have led to job insecurity—it's the price we pay for high levels of creativity, entrepreneurship, social mobility and the absence of a safety net.

          Realize, first of all, that being out of a job is due to these social factors. Plenty of workers who loved their jobs and felt they had found their dharma have also been laid off. There is no personal spiritual significance to this, even though it says a great deal about collective consciousness at this moment. What you need to do in such a crisis is avoid blaming yourself or feeling victimized. Dharma is found inside, but when external events are distressing, it's hard to go inward without confronting feelings of anxiety and hopelessness.

          Therefore, I'd advise you to focus on inner healing, not on finding your dharma. That can wait until you are feeling better. Stressful as it is to be unemployed, you still have the means to be centered and secure inside. Seek out help in this regard. Even without funds, there are public outreach programs, religious organizations and friends who can help you to find comfort. Look hard enough and you will find someone who can guide you on the path to self-confidence. Once you feel you are safe emotionally, which takes focus and patience, then looking for your life's fulfillment is the next challenge.

          Love,
          Deepak

          Next question: How do I understand the significance of my dreams?

          Every week, Deepak will be answering questions from readers just like you—ask your question now!

          Deepak Chopra is the author of more than 50 books on health, success, relationships and spirituality, including his current best-seller, Reinventing the Body, Resurrecting the Soul, and The Ultimate Happiness Prescription, which are available now. You can listen to his show on Saturdays every week on SiriusXM Channels 102 and 155.

          Keep Reading:
          Find direction in your life
          How to keep your energy positive during tough times
          How to improve a difficult work situation

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