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Dr. Robin says that the origins of Leigh's anorexia can be found well before the date she actually stopped eating regularly. Leigh says that though she was adopted, she had a "wonderful childhood." Dr. Robin asks her to more deeply analyze her feelings about being adopted.

"Now I'm more okay with it," Leigh says. "But as a child you wonder, 'Why didn't someone love me?'"

"In many ways, you are still a child who is still asking, 'Why am I unimportant?' And how do I know that? You're evaporating, you are becoming invisible," Dr. Robin says. "You are willing to die and leave your children and your husband alone to prove the fact that she wasn't worthy to be kept."

Dr. Robin says that anorexics like Leigh, and people who otherwise abuse themselves, are refusing to feed themselves physically, emotionally or spiritually. "You are redoing that pain and showing yourself that you deserve to be rejected," she says.
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FROM: Why I Hate Myself: Mothers Confess
Published on May 11, 2006

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