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George Clooney says he feels embarrassed that at one time he was not fully aware what was happening in Sudan. "I'm really slow to the Africa movement, I am ashamed to say," George says.

If you're slow to it as well, George says it's not too late to help end this genocide. George and his dad, Nick, a television news veteran, went to Sudan with the International Rescue Committee to learn for themselves what was happening.

George and Nick found a group of more than a thousand displaced families who had set up a village—but this was no refugee camp. "There were no tents to shelter them. Most just slept under trees. No food, no water," George says. "These people had jobs and property before the Arab Janjaweed militia burned their villages, raped their women and killed their children."

Since the government of Sudan won't allow anyone—not even U.N. officials—into Darfur, George and Nick continued on their journey to the Darfur-bordering country of Chad, which is itself in the midst of a coup. There they visited the Oure Cassoni refugee camp, home to 29,000 survivors of the genocide.

"There are scores of Oure Cassonis on both sides of the [Sudan-Chad] border. There are 2 million people away from their own homes," Nick says. "Time is running out."
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FROM: The Shocking Story George Clooney Has to Tell
Published on April 26, 2006

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