Dan Abrams, Rebecca Nesler and Oprah
Photo: George Burns/Harpo Studios
PAGE 6
Although Willy said he'd moved past the molestation—he mentioned several times he had many pretty girlfriends—Dan says he thinks Willy feels ashamed about what happened when he was 6 years old. "He talked about the fact that he really hated it when people would point him out and say, 'Hey, that's the kid who was molested,'" Dan says. "Once his mother became this national figure and his life was on display for the world, I think that was the hardest part for him."

In fact, Dan's interview was the first time Willy talked about his family being separated. "Obviously, it hurts him, and I know that, but him saying it validated it," Rebecca says. "That was a turning point, and that is what tore him up and led him on the wrong path—all of us being separated and how much he missed me during that time."

Rebecca says she cries because she misses Willy and wishes he could share her life with her. "He was always such a good big brother," Rebecca says. "He always took care of me." Rebecca is not the only person who will grow up without Willy—he also has a 9-year-old son who lives in Texas with his mom.

Dan thinks it's likely Willy will be in prison until 2031, the year he's eligible for parole.

More from the show:
Oprah on how molesters groom children Watch  
6 steps sex offenders take to seduce their victims
FROM: Exclusive: The 16-Year-Old Boy Who Killed His Molester
Published on October 18, 2010

NEXT STORY

Comment

LONG FORM
ONE WORD