Larry Ingargiola, director of homeland security for Saint Bernard Parish

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Another community devastated by Hurricane Katrina is Saint Bernard Parish, a suburb of New Orleans. Before the storm, more than 45,000 homes lined the town's streets. Now, only 50 homes are in livable condition, says Larry Ingargiola, Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness for Saint Bernard Parish.

According to Larry, only 20 percent of Saint Bernard residents had flood insurance when the disaster struck. Before Katrina, Saint Bernard had never flooded and was not located in a designated flood plane, Larry tells Anderson.

An insurance agent recently visited what's left of Larry's home and offered him $7,000 to repair the roof. "My house is totally destroyed," Larry says. "The only thing that's left is the roof...I'll have a new roof with nothing underneath it."

As Anderson walks the streets, he comments that Saint Bernard feels like a ghost town. For Larry, it feels like a nightmare. "Every morning I wake up, I say, 'Maybe this was a bad dream,'" he says.

Anderson tells Oprah that many people like Larry feel forgotten by their fellow Americans. "It seems like, to people [in the Gulf Coast], that the rest of the country has moved on," Anderson says. "But, when you go to New Orleans, when you go to Waveland, Mississippi, Katrina's winds are still blowing. I mean the storm is still all around...the disaster continues."
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FROM: An Oprah Special Report: The Katrina Stories No One is Telling
Published on February 21, 2006

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