Dr. Woodrow Myers
Dr. Woodrow Myers, a public health official from Indiana, tries to separate fact from fiction about the spread of HIV and AIDS. "I understand that fear, and it's a fear that many communities across the United States have," he says. "It's very important that folks know the facts, and the facts are you get this disease in blood-to-blood contact, you get this disease through sexual contact, and a mother can give this disease to her child."

Watch as residents react to Dr. Myers.

Some want to know if it would be possible to contract AIDS through urine if Mike urinated in the pool. "Urine is a body fluid, and there have been small, small numbers of the AIDS virus found in urine. But that's not the way this disease is transmitted," Dr. Myers says. "We know for a fact that all of the cases that we have seen thus far have been transmitted in very definite ways. None of those ways have included touching a doorknob or being in the swimming pool or touching the AIDS patient him- or herself. That is not the way we have seen it transmitted."

See what happens when Oprah returns to Williamson 23 years later.
FROM: AIDS in Williamson, West Virginia
Published on November 16, 1987


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