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Jim's spiritual outlook on life didn't come easily following his public disgrace. After losing his wife, his job and his identity, Jim turned to the 12-step program and Viktor Frankl's book, Man's Search for Meaning, for guidance.

"Frankl talks about love, and he talks about God," Jim says. "When you strip away everything that we have in this world, we have love and we have God. ... At the end of [life], that's all you're taking with you anyway."

The 12-step program, which was developed by Alcoholics Anonymous, helped Jim—who's not an alcoholic—understand humanity, confront his sins and accept God, he says.

At the urging of a friend, Jim also checked into a rehabilitation clinic for a week of crisis intervention after resigning from office. While at the clinic, he says he restructured his life and reconnected with his inner child.
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FROM: First Interview: Former Governor Jim McGreevey, His Gay Sex Scandal
Published on September 19, 2006

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