Lastly—and most importantly—these admitted child molesters say there are things parents can do to protect their sons and daughters.

First, Lee says to be on the alert. "You don't have to mistrust everybody," he says. "But at least open your eyes and look around and see what's happening." If you're at a party and you notice someone who spends more time with the children than the adults, Lee says it's a red flag.

When Darren's daughter first reported her abuse, Darren says he lied his way out of it. Now, he urges parents to pay attention to their children's cues and listen to them. "When they tell you someone touched me, you believe them, because kids don't lie about that stuff," he says. "A lot of times, they'll be dismissed because they'll believe the adult instead of the child. Listen to the children."

"Is there anything your daughter could have done to have stopped you?" Oprah asks.

"She did. She turned me in, and I'm very proud of her for that," Darren says. "She had every right to protect herself, and I'm glad she took that initiative."

If you're the victim of abuse, Oprah says the best way to make it stop is to tell someone. "If they don't believe you, you keep telling until somebody does," she says. "Molesters do not want you to talk. Tell somebody today."

More from Oprah's conversation with child molesters

How potential child molesters can get help
FROM: Oprah and a No-Holds-Barred Conversation with Child Molesters
Published on February 08, 2010


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