PAGE 6
Things came, Patty complained, too easily to Joey. He was goldenhaired and pretty and seemed innately to possess the answers to every test a school could give him, as though multiple-choice sequences of As and Bs and Cs and Ds were encoded in his very DNA. He was uncannily at ease with neighbors five times his age. When his school or his Cub Scout pack forced him to sell candy bars or raffle tickets door to door, he was frank about the "scam" that he was running. He perfected a highly annoying smile of condescension when faced with toys or games that other boys owned but Patty and Walter refused to buy him. To extinguish this smile, his friends insisted on sharing what they had, and so he became a crack video gamer even though his parents didn't believe in video games; he developed an encyclopedic familiarity with the urban music that his parents were at pains to protect his preteen ears from. He was no older than eleven or twelve when, at the dinner table, according to Patty, he accidentally or deliberately called his father "son."

"Oh-ho did that not go over well with Walter," she told the other mothers. "That's how the teenagers all talk to each other now," the mothers said. "It's a rap thing."

"That's what Joey said," Patty told them. "He said it was just a word and not even a bad word. And of course Walter begged to differ. And I'm sitting there thinking, 'Wal-ter, Wal-ter, don't-get into-it, point-less to argue,' but, no, he has to try to explain how, for example, even though 'boy' is not a bad word, you still can't say it to a grown man, especially not to a black man, but, of course, the whole problem with Joey is he refuses to recognize any distinction between children and grownups, and so it ends with Walter saying there won't be any dessert for him, which Joey then claims he doesn't even want, in fact he doesn't even like dessert very much, and I'm sitting there thinking, 'Wal-ter, Wal-ter, don't-get into-it,' but Walter can't help it—he has to try to prove to Joey that in fact Joey really loves dessert. But Joey won't accept any of Walter's evidence. He's totally lying through his teeth, of course, but he claims he's only ever taken seconds of dessert because it's conventional to, not because he actually likes it, and poor Walter, who can't stand to be lied to, says, 'OK, if you don't like it, then how about a month without dessert?' and I'm thinking, 'Oh, Wal-ter, Wal-ter, this-isn't going-to end-well,' because Joey's response is, 'I will go a year without dessert, I will never eat dessert again, except to be polite at somebody else's house,' which, bizarrely enough, is a credible threat—he's so stubborn he could probably do it. And I'm like, 'Whoa, guys, time-out, dessert is an important food group, let's not get carried away here,' which immediately undercuts Walter's authority, and since the whole argument has been about his authority, I manage to undo anything positive he's accomplished."

Get reading questions for your next book club meeting

Print our reading calendar and your exclusive Oprah's Book Club bookmark

Join the online discussion

NEXT STORY

Comment

LONG FORM
ONE WORD