Learn how to reach the right way
When reaching for things like the phone or a folder we sink in the middle from the waist, which collapses the rib cage, shortens our reach, and strains the back, neck, and shoulders.

The correct way
In order to reach (though you needn't be at the edge of your seat): have a straight back and hinge from the hips, not the waist. This keeps the chest open, extends your reach, and protects your neck.

The Cat
"You're likely to do the cat-and-dog stretch on the floor on all fours in a yoga class, but which you can also perform discreetly while seated. Exhale, contracting your abdomen," Kiss directs, "and slowly let your body fold, tilting your pelvis and shoulders forward, and dropping your head."

The Dog
Then inhale, opening and lifting the front of your body, including the chin: Bring the shoulders and pelvis back, creating an arch. As you exhale, begin the forward movement again. Continue alternately rounding and arching the back for six or seven repetitions.

Activate Your Thymus Gland
The thymus gland, beneath the hollow of the throat and behind the breastbone, is active when we're young, then slows as we age; it contributes to the development of a healthy immune system. "It feels good to stimulate the area periodically during the day, using the fingertips, alternating with the right and left hand, to deliver a steady thumping for about 20 thumps on the thymus. Then carry the thumping up to stimulate surface circulation—on the throat and along the jaw, from chin to ear. Tapping feels wonderful around the eyes; you can go gently right on the closed lid. Go light on the forehead, temple, and scalp, heavy on the back of the neck, and heavier still on the shoulders. Continuing, move down around the front and back of the rib cage with a light, rapid cuffing motion," Kiss says. "Top it off by heartily pummeling your lower back and hips, tapping down each arm, and shaking the hands."

Release your lower back
"This twist is an adapted version of a classic yogic pose without ever leaving your office chair," Michaeline says. "It releases the lower back even if you only maintain it for a moment."

The urban slump
"The forward slump is a very urban way to stand and walk. It puts stress on the shoulder and neck muscles. I call it the 'busy career walk'."

Correct the Urban Slump
"The forward slump is a very urban way to stand and walk. It puts stress on the shoulder and neck muscles. I call it the 'busy career walk'."

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