Hellhound on His Trail by Hampton Sides
Photo: Studio D
1. Which characters came alive for you in Hellhound on His Trail? Did you learn anything new about some of the figures involved in this period of American history, or have you come to think about certain individuals in a different way based on what you've read about them?

2. In his "Note to Readers," Hampton Sides writes, "All writers sooner or later go back to the place where they came from." Having been a child living in Memphis when Martin Luther King was shot, do you think Sides separated himself from the events he reported on in this book? Consider this question in context to the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995 or the tragic attacks of 9/11: Is it possible to be a journalistic observer of an occurrence like this when it happens in your hometown?

3. Every fact and incident in Hellhound on His Trail is impeccably sourced, yet it has the narrative drive of a thriller. What did you think of the author's treatment of the subject matter? When reading about a major historical event such as this one, do you prefer a narrative like the one Sides has constructed, one that re-creates the immediacy of the time, or a more straightforward timeline of events? How might this book differ from other nonfiction titles you may have read on the subject?

4. There are many who believe that James Earl Ray was part of a larger conspiracy and was set up to be the "fall guy" for King's assassination. Based on the evidence the author presents in Hellhound on His Trail, do you believe Ray was the sole person responsible for King's death? If so, why do you think theories of a conspiracy have persisted?

5. Talk about Ray's escape from the Missouri State Penitentiary in Jefferson City and his time on the lam before arriving in Memphis. Would he have been able to remain as anonymous today as he did then? Talk about how society has changed since 1968: Are people more or less trusting of loners like Ray nowadays?

6. In Chapter 2, the author describes King as having reached a point in his career where he had "slipped in stature, even among his own people." Were you aware of this dip in King's popularity, and if so, was it surprising to you? Talk about history's perpetuation of legend: In highlighting the achievements of a man such as King, do any cracks in his reputation become repaired, or disappear, over time?

7. Chapter 4 details FBI director J. Edgar Hoover's vendetta against King and his determination to expose King's personal transgressions. But while Hoover and his staff regularly tried to leak salacious details to the press, in Sides's words, "the media never took the bait." Why do you think this was the case? How has the media evolved in the last 50 years, especially in matters regarding the private behavior of public figures?

8. Consider the political rise of George Wallace during this period, and the number of people—including James Earl Ray—who were galvanized by his presidential campaign, particularly his pro-segregationist, if not outright racist, positions. Does Wallace bear some responsibility for King's assassination?

9. Do you see parallels between any of today's political movements and George Wallace's campaigns for office?

10. The manhunt that organized in the hours and days after King's assassination was epic; most notably, more than 3,000 FBI agents took part, and it cost upwards of $2 million (which, adjusted for inflation, would be more than $13.6 million today). Considering how much Hoover despised King, was it startling that he mobilized the bureau to such an enormous extent to find his killer?

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