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At the O-ffice
Hearst Tower
 
Welcome home, O, The Oprah Magazine and all of Hearst publications.

Hearst Tower
Designed by famed architect Lord Norman Foster, the new Hearst Tower has an innovative "diagrid" system (a word contraction of diagonal grid), that creates a series of four-story triangles on the façade. No verticle steel beams are being used, which is a first for a North American office tower.
View from the Southeast
 
View from the Southeast
The glass exterior almost makes you feel like you're floating—it also gives the staff jaw-dropping views.
A View From the Sidewalk
 
A View From the Sidewalk
The tower climbs out of the original facade of the Hearst building, which was built by William Randolph Hearst in 1928. He intended to build a skyscraper, but was delayed by the Great Depression.
Cafe 57
 
Cafe 57
The O, The Oprah Magazine staff doesn't even have to leave the building to get great food—Cafe 57 is located on the third floor.
Dining Room
 
Dining Room
Thanks to the super-high roof and glass ceilings our Cafe 57 dining room almost feels like an outdoor eatery.
Ice Falls
 
Ice Falls
Hearst's roof has been designed to collect rainwater. Some of that water is utilized for Ice Falls, a three-story, sculpted water feature within the building's atrium.
The Hearst Elevator
 
The Hearst Elevator
To use the elevators, you punch in the floor number on this small tower. It then directs you to one of the elevators.
Elevator Two
 
Elevator Two
Another elevator the O staff uses looks a little more familiar.
Window Washing
 
Window Washing
It's a full time job keeping these windows clean. Check out our special window washing machine designed to flex in and out with the building's unique design.
Hearst In the Skyline
 
Hearst In the Skyline
Can you see the Hearst Tower among the many buildings of midtown? (Look on the right side...)