The log cabin was built with untreated lumber.

Credits: Photographs by Carter Berg

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Nine years ago, Kimberly's parents bought a two-acre lakeside plot in Ontario, Canada, where the family has vacationed for generations, and built a 900-square-foot log cabin for Isabella. The logs are untreated lumber, as is all the wood in the house. "The world is full of land mines—I see peanut butter around every corner," Kimberly says. "That's why the cottage in Canada is such a godsend."

The fabrics in the home are either organic cotton—which Kimberly washes "a million times" in Dr. Bronner's Sal Suds—or vintage linens that she trusts have already shed their original chemicals but that she washes and rewashes anyway. Ancient quilts are reborn as pillows; 1940s tablecloths make colorful curtains; old coffee tins hold clusters of low pollen flowers, such as cosmos.
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