Jean Chatzky
After spending years in high-power positions in the entertainment industry, Libby Gill left the corporate world to pursue writing and eventually became a personal life coach. Jean talks with Libby about her books and her decision to start a new career midlife.

Between her work as a public relations executive and raising two children, Libby says she lost herself and her true passion in life. "I had this sort of spiritual journey and decided there was another me under all those years of work and having kids," she says.

After leaving her job, Libby wrote Stay-At-Home Dads: The Essential Guide to Creating the New Family in 2001, a book based on the new role reversal taking place in the United States that she and her then-husband had experienced. The book garnered much media attention and caused some debate, Libby says. "Traditionally, when men have done 'women's' work, they have been diminished, but when women do 'men's' work, they're glorified," she says. Now, more than seven years after the book was first published, Libby says stay-at-home dads are becoming more socially accepted.

While Libby says her career as an author took off, she wanted to continue pursuing another passion—becoming a personal coach and helping others get what they want in life. One of the obstacles Libby says she often faced when coaching clients was their emotional baggage—most of it from childhood. "Emotional remnants of your past stick with you, and without your knowing it, sometimes they influence how you are making decisions," she says. She wrote Traveling Hopefully: How to Lose Your Family Baggage and Jumpstart Your Life, a book designed to help people get over their hang-ups from the past. By encouraging her clients to take risks and redefine who they are and how they present themselves to others, Libby says she is accomplishing her dream of helping others succeed.