Take Charge
When the 735-room, filthy, decrepit Times Square Hotel (a.k.a. Homeless Hell) went bankrupt in the late 1980s, I wanted someone to turn it into quality supportive housing—with employment services, a clinic, and caseworkers right in the building. Not a shelter but permanent, dignified housing. Because I'd been development coordinator for Catholic Charities of Brooklyn, I knew what questions financiers, tenants, and the city would need answered, and I wrote up a plan. Everyone I talked to was too overcommitted to take it on. They all agreed, though, that someone really ought to do it. Finally, I thought, 'Oh, someone is me.'"
—Rosanne Haggerty, Founder, Common Ground, a nonprofit that aims to end homelessness
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Don't Be Afraid to Be Different
"I didn't have a showroom. I was totally freaked out about that: I live above a restaurant, and buyers had to walk through a side door near the dining room to get to my tiny apartment. But people loved coming over. I'd serve cookies and have a fire going. They said it was a relief from the other showings they'd been to. Sometimes when you're forced into doing things in an unexpected way, you make a big impression. And with so many people out there, being yourself is the only way to stand out."
—Lana Bilzerian, Knitwear Designer

Ask for Help
"I couldn't make all the cookies in my own kitchen, and I didn't want to pay for an expensive industrial mixer, so I called a local restaurant that served only lunch and dinner and asked if I could use their mixer in the mornings. They said, 'yes.'"
—Debbie Godowsky, Owner, Cookies Direct, which sells care packages to send to kids in college
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Split Your Time
"I couldn't quit my job, but I did take a lower-paying position that had more flexible hours. Then I signed up for night courses in flower arranging at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and at Parsons School of Design. I started taking orders out of my house."
—Katrina Parris, Founder, Katrina Parris Flowers
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Take Rejection in Stride
"I knew how to make up a business plan. Much more daunting was the idea of getting a bank to lend me $1.5 million. I was turned down 32 times by male bankers. My 33rd presentation was to a female banker in New York. She didn't even let me finish my pitch before agreeing to give me the money."
—Catherine Hughes, Founder and Chairperson, Radio One

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