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Next, Amber, Alberto and Peter tackle the worst room in the house—the basement. Nearly all 1,000 square feet of the room is filled with wall-to-wall clutter. "What you have here is a foundation of emotional clutter your house is built on," Peter says.

Peter helps Amber and Alberto sort their clutter into two types: Memory clutter and "I-Might-Need-It-One-Day" clutter. The three of them get to work sorting through clothing, crafting materials and holiday decorations.

One thing Peter insists will stay is a bin of sporting equipment that Amber says they stopped using because they couldn't find it. "If you want the kids to get healthier, you need them to have the stuff out and accessible for the kids," Peter says.

After a preliminary sort, Amber and Alberto make even more progress with Peter's "Quick to Go" technique. They make rapid decisions on what they really need, but Amber panics when she thinks about giving up her great-grandmother's juicer, even though she says she would never use it. "It infuriates me that this can create so much emotion and you treat it with such disrespect by leaving it here in the basement covered in dust," Peter says.

In four hours, a team of 13 people completely clear Amber's basement. "I'm about ready to pee my pants," Amber says. "This is great!"
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FROM: Does This Clutter Make My Butt Look Fat? with Peter Walsh
Published on March 14, 2008

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