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Heartburn
Packing on a few pounds isn't the only consequence of indulging in holiday treats. Eating a meal loaded with fatty foods will slow digestion—which means that food remains in the stomach longer, causing gastric pressure to rise; this can lead to painful heartburn as stomach acid splashes back up into the esophagus. Alcohol and peppermint may also be to blame because science has shown that they can relax the muscle barrier between the stomach and esophagus, causing acid reflux. Occasional heartburn is nothing to worry about, but frequent bouts can damage the esophagus and even wear away its lining. Not everyone gets heartburn from the same foods, so track which ones kick up acid reflux for you. And avoid waist-cinching outfits or belts that can squeeze your stomach and force food to travel upward.
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As a reminder, always consult your doctor for medical advice and treatment before starting any program.

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