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Paul says that the most difficult part of having blue skin is the intense, quizzical stares he gets when he is out in public—but he says he understands why they stare. "When you see something that's so unusual, something that you've probably never seen before, it's just natural for people to be curious," he says.

Dr. Oz says Paul may need to get used to those stares—for the rest of his life. His skin will never return to its natural color. "You've been drinking it long and you've been putting it on your skin," he says. "So it's in your liver and your brain, which is why sometimes it can cause seizures if it gets to high enough amounts."

Dr. Oz offers to draw some of Paul's blood to make sure his changes are only skin deep…and not dangerous to his health.

"Be my guest," Paul says. "It's a deal."


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FROM: Dr. Oz Investigates the Man Who Turned Blue
Published on May 08, 2009

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