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What to Do When You've Overeaten
You didn't plan to indulge, but one primo led to a secondo, and then a dolce...and now you're full-to-bursting. Here's how to find some relief—as well as what not to do.
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stomach ache remedies
Meet Your New After-Dinner Drink
Naturally caffeine-free chicory-root tea can relax your mood and possibly your digestive tract, as well, says Beth McDonald, an integrative and sports nutritionist at the Continuum Center for Health and Healing, an integrative health program affiliated with Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. Chicory, which usually has a roasted-coffee flavor, is known among herbalists for helping to move things along. Chamomile tea has a similarly sedating effect on the digestive system.

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    The Healing Power of Herbs
    Dr. Mehmet Oz
    Instead of turning to pharmaceutically manufactured drugs when you have an ache or pain, herbalist Peeka Trenkle suggests turning to Mother Nature and one of her many herbal remedies.

    Dr. Oz talks with Peeka about readily available herbs that she says can cure common ailments:



    • Hawthorn: This herb is a member of the apple family and helps the body adapt to stress. It also helps regulate blood flow in and out of the heart, Peeka says. If you are on high blood pressure or hypertension medication, you should let your doctor know if you are taking hawthorn because Peeka says the herb can reduce your need for medication.
    • Milky Oat Seed: Milky oat seed is a small part of the oat plant that comes to flower before it turns into grain. It can be used in extract form or as a tea to help build energy and stamina over time, Peeka says.
    • Peppermint: One of the longest-used herbs, peppermint can be taken in oil or in capsule form to help cure lethargy and offer a pick-me-up that isn't too stimulating or irritating to the digestive tract, Peeka says.
    • Ginger: Whether eaten raw, in tea, as an extract, as a syrup or in cooking, Peeka says ginger relaxes the digestive tract and can help calm acid reflux, an irritable bowel and stomach upsets.
    • Lavender: The buds of lavender flowers can be steeped into a tea and added to your bathwater as an herbal remedy to cure insomnia, Peeka says. "Lavender has an ability to sedate the nerves that is not drug-like in its effect," she says.
    • Sage: This herb helps your body absorb oils better, and drinking sage tea could help people who are chronically dry, Peeka says.
    If you are going to try an herbal remedy, Peeka suggests doing your own research and taking one herb at a time in the form of either a tea or oil instead of a capsule. "Using capsules makes your body need to break things down in a different way, so if you are going to use capsules try to use only the herbs that you would naturally eat," she says.

    Also, Peeka says herbs are not the end-all answer for your health problems. "If you're not having a benefit from an herb used according to the directions for a period of maybe three weeks, stop it—don't take any more of it," she says.
    The information provided here is for entertainment and informational purposes. You should consult your own physician before starting any treatment, diet or exercise program. The opinions expressed by the hosts, guests and callers to Oprah Radio are strictly their own.

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      Dietary and Natural Remedies for Tonsillitis
      Ginger
      I had my tonsils removed at age 7—I didn't have a choice. I was told I was being taken on vacation and was instead deposited in a hospital, spanked on the bottom and put into bed, where I proceeded to scream my little head off for the duration of my time there. My parents thought they were sparing me the stress of knowing what was going on (and perhaps sparing themselves the stress of telling me they were sending me off to have my body parts yanked out) for my own good.

      I mentioned to a doctor years later on a routine visit that perhaps my immune system was compromised as a result of not having my tonsils. "Nonsense," he told me. "Tonsils are not necessary. If something is infected, take it out. That's what we're here for."

      "Hmm," I thought. "Fancy our creator giving us all these body parts we don't really need and that are eventually going to cost us several days off work, much stress and discomfort—not very forward thinking."


      After my traumatic hospital visit, I was quite happy to hear the nurse recommending to my mother to give me ice cream—a just reward, I felt, for what I had just been put through. Oh, if only I knew then what I know now. That very reward and my love of all things sweet, creamy and comforting was the devil that had put me in that hospital in the first place. Isn't it tragic how the very things that so seductively tempt our palate and offer us moments of sheer bliss can turn out to be our worst enemies? Wouldn't it have made more sense to make everything that's bad for us taste so disgusting that we wouldn't ever let it pass our lips?

      These days, I tend to choose medical doctors who have integrated a more holistic approach to health and medicine. The body is an intricate machine, and there is a valid purpose for all the body parts we come endowed with. From my personal experience, disease is very often a result of my actions and choices. When I accept responsibility for my part in creating these health conditions, then I see it as something I can change by making healthier choices.

      "Integrative health" is a phrase we're hearing more about these days—a mind/body/spirit approach to health. It integrates conventional medical practice with alternative or complementary treatments like herbal medicine, homeopathy, acupuncture, massage, dietary therapies and stress-reduction techniques. I have had the opportunity over the years to work with many people with various health conditions, and I'm always excited to witness the transformations and miracles that can happen when some simple dietary and lifestyle changes are implemented.

      As part of the lymphatic system, tonsils are a vital component of the immune system. They are our first line of defense against potentially harmful bacteria and viruses that may enter the body via the nose and mouth. They fight off infections, particularly infections of the upper respiratory tract. It is no coincidence that I developed pneumonia shortly after my tonsils were removed and was much more susceptible to colds and flu. When any part of a system is taken away, it obviously puts more stress on the rest of that system, which must work harder to make up for the missing link. The thymus gland, spleen and bone marrow are other components of the immune system, and when they have to work beyond the call of duty, it's more likely that other health issues will occur.

      7 dietary changes that ward off tonsillitis
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        The Yes-I-Can Diet
        Think you can't lose weight? Maybe you don't know your own strength, says hypnotherapist Jean Fain, whose blend of attitude adjustment and practical advice works wonders for her clients (and will for you, too).
        diet
        Photo: Thinkstock
        As if reading from a script, dieters who settle onto my couch start their story virtually the same way: "I've tried everything. Nothing works. I can't lose weight—keep it off—get off this plateau—." With each failed diet, each pound lost and regained, they've grown more desperate. Baggy clothes and crossed arms can't hide their shame. Defeated dieters live with the delusion that no matter what they do, they can't lose weight.

        If all goes well, after a number of sessions clients change their tune. "I can't" becomes "Maybe I can," which finally shifts to "I can." En route to their desired weight, determined dieters develop a firm belief in their abilities. I've witnessed this shifting-to-I-can phenomenon many times among long-term weight loss successes.

        How do you make that vital change?

        New clients often expect me to transform their attitude and figure instantly and effortlessly with hypnotic suggestions. That's fantasy. A good hypnotherapist can help bring about that transformation-by first focusing the client's attention, then offering tailor-made suggestions and images to the receptive unconscious mind-but not without time and effort on the dieter's part. Whether the shift happens in a momentary aha or a gradual dawning, it's unmistakable. Clients at my Concord, Massachusetts, practice and the Harvard Medical School hospital where I teach have literally exclaimed, "I can do this!"

        To get clients started, I take a detailed diet history, listening particularly for what has helped and what has hindered their weight loss in the past. Most people who come to me see themselves as total failures; they don't realize they've done some things right. I tell them stories of the dieters I know who are winning the battle of the bulge and describe their individual strategies-which methods they've made use of, which they've tossed. Hearing others' stories gives people an idea of how they might succeed. I watch for the glimmer of hope in their eyes, the momentary identification that could inspire a shifting process in them. The shape-up strategy that arouses the most genuine hope has the best chance.

        Learning to get to "I can" is not unlike learning to have an orgasm. You hear your friends' experiences, ask about technique, and explore your own body. Through trial and error, you figure out what turns you on, what turns you off, what satisfies you when you've got ample time or next to none.

        Sometimes getting started requires nothing more than sitting back and listening to someone else's story. Here are four different weight loss successes, four women who took their own routes to "I can." So take a deep breath and a leap of faith, and give yourself permission to feel out whether any one of their paths resonates for you.

        Next: Putting yourself first
        PAGE 1 of 5

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          Radical Weight Loss Surgery
          Carol has been battling obesity for decades.
          Like millions of men and women across the country, Carol has been struggling with her weight for decades. At 5'2'' and 287 pounds, this 60-year-old woman is one of the 15 million Americans considered morbidly obese.

          Carol says she weighed almost 490 pounds at her heaviest. Since then, she's tried dieting, exercising, stomach stapling and gastric bypass surgery to reach a healthy weight...but nothing has worked. "I've always known in my heart that there had to be something else," she says.

          What if there was a medical solution that could put an end to Carol's yo-yo dieting, food cravings and calorie counting? Well, there is.
          PAGE 1 of 6
          FROM: Dr. Oz Investigates: Flesh-Eating Bacteria
          Published on April 28, 2009

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            Where Does Your Time Go?
            Like everyone in her acquaintance, she's overtaxed, overtired, overanxious, and in way over her head. Her question: is it possible for any of us to stop and smell the daffodils?
            Lisa Kogan
            Illustration: John Ritter
            A friend once told me about the Buddhist concept of pain without suffering; it's a notion that fascinates me. I mean, is it really possible to say, "Yep, my stomach aches, all right, but I don't have to add insult to injury by letting that pain run amok: I can decide to skip the part where I moan, 'Now I can't meet my friends at the movie and I'll probably miss work tomorrow, which means I'll blow my deadline, lose my job and die penniless and alone, never having seen Dreamgirls.'"

            Calming a frantic brain in the face of high anxiety is a pretty tall order, especially for a woman like me who tends to operate on two basic emotions: panic and barely suppressed panic. But assuming one can actually achieve pain without suffering, where else might this dynamic be applied? Is there such a thing as anger without brooding? Sex without strings? And the real question—my current obsession—can a person feel unbelievably busy without feeling unbelievably overwhelmed?

            Lately, I seem to have this constant sense that I'm just keeping my head above water. I'm forever trying to catch up, stay in touch and be where I'm supposed to be when I'm supposed to be there. I bought a new pair of jeans in November, but I've never worn them because I've never had a chance to get them hemmed. The last novel I remember curling up with is Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret—and that was in sixth grade. I floss while sorting mail, while defrosting lamb chops, while searching for Mrs. Weinstein, my 3-year-old daughter's stuffed platypus.

            But this is not just about being a single mother (though I do spend an ungodly amount of time wondering why my daughter is not on a first-name basis with her stuffed platypus). Almost everybody I know—whether they're wealthy or struggling to make ends meet, whether they're bachelor girls or celebrating their 25th anniversary, whether their kids are grown or toddlers or nonexistent—everyone seems to be suffering from some sort of culturally induced ADD. Our brains are swamped and our bodies are tired. Blood pressures are up, serotonin levels are down, tempers are short, to-do lists are long, and nerves are shot.

            Here's how I spent last Saturday...see if any of it rings a bell:

            3:17 a.m. 
            I am awakened by the sound of Julia's voice. "Mommy, Giovanni picked his nose and it bleeded," she informs me. "Good to know," I murmur. "Now go back to sleep before Mommy kills you." Somewhere in England, the Super-nanny is appalled. 

            4:26 a.m. 
            I have to pee. My bladder used to be legendary. As God is my witness, I could go three, maybe four months without ever needing the ladies' room; I could drive from the redwood forest to the Gulf Stream waters sans bathroom break. But I'm 46 now, and believe me, it's a whole new ball game. 

            4:27 a.m. 
            I live in mortal fear that the slightest movement anywhere in the apartment will wake Princess Bunny Pie. I will not move. I will not move. I will not move. 

            4:33 a.m. 
            I will move, but I will move in stealthy, gazelle-like silence. 

            4:34 a.m. 
            Here's the thing about stealthy, gazelle-like silence—it's doable only if you don't step barefoot on a Lego. 

            5:19 a.m. 
            Miss Cuckoo Pants insists it's time to rise and shine. I offer her a check for $260,000 if she will sleep for just one more hour. But the kid sees through me like a bar of used Neutrogena and reminds me that I still owe her 85 grand from the time she tasted a parsnip.
            PAGE 1 of 4

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