Woman reading menu in restaurant

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Delicious Language
We know better than to fall for "creamy," but not all unhealthy code words are so blatant. "Crispy" meat, fish and vegetables are usually fried in oil; "crusted" entrees often involve lots of butter, cheese or oil (that's what helps the breadcrumbs, almonds and flour stick); "rich," "velvety" and "gooey" can signify sky-high amounts of fat; "sizzling" food sizzles because of (you guessed it) oil. Detailed descriptions make food sound even more appealing: In one study by Brian Wansink, PhD, author of Mindless Eating, diners were 27 percent more likely to get dessert when it was called "German Black Forest double-chocolate cake" instead of "chocolate cake. Try to read between the lines of unusual techniques like "oil-poaching," which involves submerging food in oil and cooking it slowly over low heat. From a health perspective, that's closer to frying than water-poaching.
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