PAGE 16


Linda:
Yeah, and we have Christmas cookies in the cookie jar, which I have not eaten. So for the last week, I have been on the program.

Bob:
Great.

Linda:
So I'm trying. You know, it's just the—the pressures you feel from even a restaurant. I went to a restaurant recently and thought I was doing very well at my choices, and then I come to find out it's a high-calorie mayonnaise in the chicken salad that was listed as the diet delights on their menu.

Bob:
That's one example and one thing and at least you took the trouble to find that out.

Linda:
Right.

Bob:
But I recommend if you dine out a lot, you probably— you should—you should get a list of all the menus of the restaurants you frequent and know what meals are appropriate. And you can have a whole drawer stacked with all the restaurants in your area that either deliver or that you show up in person and know what you're ordering before you go in there. And it requires a little bit of homework, but it sounds like you're going to be able to do that if you're willing to do that homework and you make it a priority in your life.

Oprah:
Thank you, Linda

Linda:
If I can do the homework. Thank you.

Oprah:
Thank you.

Linda:
Good luck.

Oprah:
And also, this is what people don't realize. You know, when you read a menu, what's on the menu just lets you know what's in the kitchen. So the fact that they have chicken with the mayonnaise means there's chicken back there. So you can always say, "May I have some chicken?" I just did this—I just did this the other day.

Bob:
It's amazing. Or you go to an Italian restaurant and they have a dish that has a red sauce and they have an alfredo, but the fettuccini has the alfredo. Well, they have both so switch them.

Oprah:
Ask them to switch them.

Bob:
Restaurants are accommodating. Especially these days. They'll do anything to keep a customer if you look the person in the eye and say, "I want it made this way, and I want olive oil, not some other fat.

Oprah:
Yeah.

Bob:
And you say exactly what you want. And you say, "I don't want the bread basket on the table." They'll respond.

Oprah:
Absolutely. Bob, you said people can't drink soda but our message boards are filling up with questions from people who want to know if they can drink diet soda.

Bob:
That's a take great question. They can. However, in the final phase of the program, I highly recommend you do away with it. When we study—

Oprah:
The final phase is what? Can you have it for the month or not, Bob?

Bob:
Yes. To replace your soda, you can. However, I do want to say eventually you want to give it up, and I'll tell you why. It's going to save you calories and it's going to get you past—if you're used to —

Oprah:
It's only 1—it's only 1 calorie.

Bob:
It's going to save—then I'm going to tell you why it's going to save you calories. Because we do studies on people. They will—they will then replace those calories later in the day. And for some unexplained reason—

Oprah:
I don't—I'm misunderstanding you. You say replacing the calories. It's only 1 calorie or 0 calories.

Bob:
No. Your body senses the fact—you open up room and you will wind up—when we study people that have reduced-calorie drinks—

Oprah:
Yes.

Bob:
—they wind up eating more in the day than those that didn't have that or that had water.

Oprah:
I love this. So everybody—

Bob:
And most people will have—they don't have one soda. Most of the people that you know go down that road will have six, seven—

Oprah:
I know people that drink diet—you know, volumes of diet soda all day long.

Bob:
Yeah. And when you follow them around, they'll wind up eating more calories than a person that has something like water or a spritzer or something more healthful to drink.

NEXT STORY

Next Story

Comment

LONG FORM
ONE WORD