Graying Skin
If your skin doesn't seem to "glow" in the way it used to, it may be a red flag for kidney problems. Your kidneys filter wastes and excess fluids from your blood, which are then excreted in your urine. When chronic kidney failure reaches an advanced stage, dangerous levels of fluid, electrolytes, and wastes can accumulate in your body. The "good news" is that kidney problems can cause anemia, which will lead to a gray-skin warning sign. If you notice your skin looking duller than usual, be sure to check in with your doctor.

Loss of Smell
Losing your sense of smell may be an early warning sign of Parkinson's disease. The degenerative nerve disorder usually starts slowly and worsens over time, leading with muscle tremors to slowness of voluntary movements, muscle stiffness, imbalance, changes in speech, and dementia.

Catch this debilitating disease early by testing your sense of smell. Start by holding an open rubbing-alcohol swab by your belly button and slowly raising it to your nose. If you can smell the swab 8 to 12 inches away from your nose, your sense of smell is normal. But if you only start to smell it 4 inches away, it indicates a loss of smell.

There are other reasons your sense of smell may be lacking, and alpha-lipoic acid may be able to help in some of those cases. Made naturally in the body and available from food sources like spinach, broccoli, and yeast, alpha lipoic acid has been used for decades in Europe to treat nerve conditions. Try taking just 600 mg daily.

Next: Why it's important to keep an eye on your feet and toes


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