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Like Angela, 44-year-old Sherri also eats in her sleep. She says she's been doing it for 13 years.

One night, Sherri starts her sleepeating at midnight, totally oblivious to her son, who is in the room videotaping. First she eats coleslaw and lunch meat, and guzzles milk right from its container. Later, she dunks bread heated in a microwave, sliced ham and crackers into dip.

Sherri says she only finds out about her sleepeating—which she says can pack on between 1,500 to 3,000 calories in a night—when she wakes up with stomachaches and sees the physical evidence of her gorging left around the kitchen. "There will be a spoon or crackers left out or dip. Something will be left," she says. "You're kind of on autopilot, so you don't remember at the time, but you have recollections of it in the morning."
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FROM: Dr. Oz Investigates Night Terrors
Published on January 01, 2006
As a reminder, always consult your doctor for medical advice and treatment before starting any program.

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