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Whole Wheat Pizza Dough
If you've never made pizza dough before, or if you have and wish you hadn't, you'll be delightfully surprised at how simple this recipe is. The dough keeps marvelously well in the refrigerator overnight or in the freezer.
Servings: Makes 2 thick crust pizzas or 4 thin crust pizzas
Ingredients
  • 2 1/2 cups whole wheat whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup unbleached all-purpose unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 2 packages dry active dry active yeast
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 1/2 lukewarm water from the tap
  • 1/2 teaspoon olive olive oil
  • Flour for the work surface
  • Sprinkling of ' ' cornmeal ' '
Directions
Place flour, yeast, salt and sugar in a mixer fitted with a dough hook. While mixer is running, gradually add water and knead on low speed until dough is firm and smooth, about ten minutes. Turn machine off.

Pour oil down inside of bowl. Turn on low once more for 15 seconds to coat inside of bowl and all surfaces of dough with the oil. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let rise in warm spot until doubled in bulk, about two hours.

Preheat your oven to highest setting, 500° or 550°F. If using a pizza stone, place stone in oven on bottom rack, preheat oven one hour ahead. Punch dough down, cut in half. On generously floured work surface, place one half of dough.

By hand, form dough loosely into a ball, stretch into a circle. Using a floured rolling pin, roll dough into large circle until very thin. Don't worry if your circle isn't perfect and if you get a hole; just pinch edges back together.

To prevent dough from sticking to counter, turn dough over, add flour to dough, counter and rolling pin as needed. Sprinkle pizza peel or cookie sheet generously with cornmeal. Transfer dough to pizza peel or cookie sheet with no lip. Add toppings.

Slide dough onto pizza stone or place cookie sheet with pizza on bottom rack. Bake 10–12 minutes or until golden. To remove pizza from oven stone, slide cookie sheet under dough onto another cookie sheet, slice and serve immediately.

Roll out remaining dough and top with desired toppings or freeze in freezer bags.

Recommended technique: Make double batches of the dough, divide and freeze leftovers so you've never got an excuse to eat out. Place a bag of dough on the counter before you leave for work. By the time you cruise in from your commute, the dough will be ready to roll, top and bake.

From the book Cooking Thin with Chef Kathleen

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Microwave Pizza Sauce
This isn't so much a recipe as it is a technique, but it's important to know. This base sauce can be morphed into full-fledged pizza or pasta sauce. Make it in batches and freeze it in dinner size and pizza size portions. You don't have to cook every element of every meal from scratch, especially with recipes like this.
Servings: Makes 8 or more servings
Ingredients
  • 2 cans (28 ounces) whole peeled tomatoes
Directions
Pour tomatoes into a strainer that has been fitted over a microwave proof bowl. Using your hands, crush the tomatoes. Press all juices into bowl. Set crushed tomatoes aside.

Place bowl with tomato juices in microwave and cook on high until pizza sauce or ketchup thick, about 20 to 25 minutes. Add crushed tomatoes to sauce. Cool to room temperature.

Flavor the sauce any way you like and use it on pizza, pasta or to thicken soups and sauces.

Recommended technique: All canned tomatoes are not created equal. Make sure they have no added sugar, fat or sodium. To find the best tasting brand, buy two different brands at a time and do side by side comparisons. Keep taste testing until you've come across one you love. Muir Glenn and Progresso brands are consistently good, but you be the judge.

From the book Cooking Thin with Chef Kathleen

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Mock Italian Sausage
When you're working hard to cut calories but you're craving some spicy Italian sausage, try this quick mock version. It's great as a pizza topping and in soup when you're trying to "beef" up a broth to make it more substantial.
Servings: Makes about 1/2 pound of sausage
Ingredients
  • 1/2 pound chicken chicken tenderloin
  • 1/4 small ' ' sweet sweet onion , cut in half
  • 1 clove garlic , cut in half
  • 1/4 teaspoon red red pepper flakes , more or less to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed fennel fennel seed
  • Coarse Coarse salt and cracked black black pepper to taste
Directions
Place all ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until it looks like ground chicken or hamburger meat.

Heat a non-stick pan over medium heat. When hot, add mock sausage mix and cook, stirring often until crumbly and cooked through, about 7–9 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings.

Recommended substitution: If you like sweet Italian sausage, don't use the chili flakes. Instead, add 1/4 teaspoon of allspice and one teaspoon dried oregano.

Recommended technique: This recipe uses chicken tenderloin, which is usually cheaper than boneless breasts. You'll have to trim the vein, but it's really easy—like unzipping a zipper with your knife. You can ask your butcher to grind the tenderloin for you, or do it at home. Just cut the chicken into one-inch pieces and pulse in a food processor (about three or four quick pulses) until it looks like ground chicken.

From the book Cooking Thin with Chef Kathleen

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Second Helping Salad
This is really a spinach, cucumber and chickpea salad with a zesty, lemony cumin vinaigrette. It's super quick to prepare, has many interesting flavors and textures, and it's quite satisfying to eat.
Servings: Makes 4–6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup fresh lemon fresh lemon juice
  • Coarse-grain Coarse-grain salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon cumin
  • 2 tablespoons olive olive oil (optional)
  • 4 scallions , thinly sliced, white parts only
  • 1 English English cucumber , peeled, seeded and thinly sliced
  • 1 pint cherry cherry tomatoes , halved
  • 1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas , drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped flat-leaf flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped mint
  • 1/2 bag salad salad greens , the healthiest kind you can stand
  • 1/2 bag pre-washed baby baby spinach
Directions
In the bowl you'll serve the salad in, whisk together lemon juice, salt, cumin and olive oil. Add scallions, cucumbers, tomatoes, chickpeas, parsley and mint. Toss to combine. Add salad greens and spinach. Toss to combine, taste and adjust seasonings. Serve immediately.

Recommended accompaniments: If you want to up the good calories, shredded carrots and mango are really delicious in this salad. If you're serving this as an entrée and you've got a meat-eater to satisfy, this salad is wonderful with very thinly sliced grilled flank steak or chicken on top. Keep it vegetarian and serve it over bulgur.

Recommended substitution: This recipe doesn't suffer if you leave the oil out. If you can get your hands on sumac, sprinkle it over the salad just before you serve it. Sumac is a fruit that's dried and ground into a reddish powder. It's often combined with salt when you buy it. It's salty, tart and a little sour, and goes well with this dish.

From the book Cooking Thin with Chef Kathleen

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Warm Chocolate Pudding
When Kathleen's sister, Talitha, was old enough to use the stove, she and her friend, Erin, would sneak into the kitchen during all-night monster movie marathon sleepovers to make this pudding. Instead of waiting for it to cool, they'd eat it warm.
Servings: Makes 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup cocoa cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 cups low-fat low-fat or non-fat non-fat milk
  • 2 ounces bittersweet bittersweet chocolate
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla vanilla extract
Directions
In a medium, heavy-bottomed sauce pan, stir together sugar, cocoa powder and cornstarch. Turn heat to medium high. Gradually add milk and stir constantly until pudding begins to boil and thicken, about five minutes.

Reduce heat to medium low, add bittersweet chocolate and continue heating five minutes more until pudding is completely thickened. Remove from heat, let cool five minutes.

Add vanilla and pour into pudding cups. Eat immediately or refrigerate.

From the book Cooking Thin with Chef Kathleen

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Wheat Pizza Dough
Try chef Curtis Stone's recipe for Wheat Pizza Dough, a component of his savory Prosciutto and Portobello Mushroom Wheat Pizza . Get more recipes from his menu !
Curtis Stone's Wheat Pizza Dough
Recipe created by Curtis Stone
Servings: Makes 3 balls of dough (8 ounces each)
Ingredients
  • 1/4 ounce dry or fresh dry or fresh yeast
  • 1 tsp. honey
  • 1 cup warm water (110 to 115°)
  • 2 cups all-purpose all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup wheat wheat flour , plus more for dusting
  • 1 tsp. kosher kosher salt
  • 1 Tbsp. extra-virgin extra-virgin olive oil , plus more for brushing
Directions
In a small mixing bowl, combine yeast, honey and warm water and mix to dissolve. Allow mixture to sit at room temperature for 5 minutes.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, salt, oil and yeast mixture. Mix until all ingredients are fully incorporated, and then remove dough to a floured (wheat flour) work surface. Knead for 5 to 8 minutes or until the dough is smooth but firm.

Place dough in a mixing bowl and cover bowl with a warm, damp cloth and set in a warm spot for 30 to 40 minutes or until dough has risen to almost 1 1/2 times its size.

Divide the dough into 3 evenly sized balls (about 8 ounces each), and pull the sides of each ball down and tuck into the bottom of itself. Then, roll the dough under your hand until the top is smooth and has regained slight firmness.

Place the balls of dough back into the same bowl, rub lightly with oil and cover with a warm, damp cloth, and let rise for an additional 15 to 20 minutes in a warm spot. Pound the dough on a floured work surface and reform into balls.

Brush with a little olive oil and refrigerate covered until ready to use for up to 2 days. Dough will also keep in freezer for up to 2 months if tightly wrapped in plastic wrap.
FROM: Celebrity Chefs Move In with Viewer Families
Published on March 11, 2009

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