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One Baking Sheet, 6 Dinners
The mighty sheet pan could be the most versatile item in your kitchen. It's big enough to hold an entire meal, and its low, inch-high sides makes it perfect for roasting foods without steaming them.
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Roasted Pork Tenderloin and Garlic
The Pork Supper You Just Might Make Every Single Week
There's no need to reserve pork tenderloin for dinner parties or holidays when it's such a breeze to make. Just remember to turn on the oven before you begin any of the prep, so by the time you're ready to slide the seasoned pork and a dozen or so whole cloves of peeled garlic into the oven, it's superhot. The metal pan will give the meat a golden and lightly crisped edge, and within about 20 minutes you'll have a tray full of juicy, tender pork and spreadable garlic that's perfect with the meat or on bread.

Get the recipe: Roasted Pork Tenderloin and Garlic

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    Baked Polenta Layered with Mushroom Ragú Recipe
    Polenta pasticciata is a layered baked dish, just like lasagna, but made with warm, fresh polenta instead of pasta. And, like lasagna, it is marvelously versatile: you can fill the layers of polenta with all manner of good things—cheeses, vegetables, meats, or sauces, or a combination of everything. People absolutely love it for the complexity of flavor, and because it can be prepared in advance.
    Baked Polenta Layered with Mushroom Ragu
    Photo: Marcus Nilsson

    Serves 12, with leftovers that can easily be frozen

    Ingredients

    • 1 batch (about 10 cups) Basic Polenta, freshly made and hot, with or without freshly grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (it will be richer if you include it, but just as good without it)
    • 4 to 6 cups Mushroom Ragú
    • 2 Tbsp. soft butter for the baking dish, or more if needed
    • 1 to 2 cups shredded Muenster or dry-packed mozzarella, Italian Fontina, cheddar, or a soft cheese of your liking
    • 1/2 to 1 cup grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

    Directions


    Preheat the oven to 400° F, and set a rack in the center. Make your polenta in a large bowl, then put plastic wrap over the top, to keep it warm and to prevent a skin from forming on top. Be sure to assemble the pasticciata within 1/2 hour, while the polenta is still warm and soft with no lumps.

    If necessary, heat the filling sauce to quite warm. If it is too dense for spreading, thin it with some water.

    Butter the bottom and sides of a 9-by-13-inch baking dish or a 12-inch cast-iron skillet thoroughly. Use more butter on the bottom, in particular, if you want to unmold the pasticciata onto a platter.

    Pour in half the polenta (approximately 5 cups), and spread it evenly in the bottom of the pan. Scatter 1/3 cup or more shredded Muenster or other soft cheese all over the top, then sprinkle on 2 to 4 tablespoons of grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano. Pour or ladle 2 cups of the warm sauce over the polenta and cheese, and spread it all over—use 3 cups sauce if you want a thicker layer.

    Pour on a bit more than half of the remaining polenta (about 3 cups) and spread it, and top with shredded soft cheese and grated hard cheese in the amounts you like. Pour in the remaining sauce, and spread it evenly, reserving a cup, if you have enough and plan to unmold the pasticciata.

    For the top layer, spread all the rest of the polenta, and another 1/4 cup sauce on top of that. Sprinkle on more shredded soft cheese and grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano. If you're making a thin pasticciata in a big pan, or want it to have a beautiful deep-golden crust or gratinato, use enough cheese to really cover the top. Do not compress the cheeses, though. (See note below.)

    Set the pan on a cookie sheet, and bake for 45 minutes to an hour, or more, until the top is deeply colored and crusted, even browned a bit on the edges. Let the pasticciata cool for a few minutes before serving. If serving portions from the baking pan, cut into squares (like lasagna), or wedges if you've used a round skillet or pan, and lift them out with a spatula.

    If unmolding the pasticciata: Let it cool for at least 10 minutes. Run a knife around the sides of the pan, cutting through any crust sticking to the rim or sides. Lay a big board on top of the baking pan or skillet, hold the two together (with the protection of cloths and the help of other hands if necessary), and flip them over. Rap on the upturned pan bottom—or bang on it all over—to loosen the bottom. Lift the board, and give the pan a good shake. The pasticciata will eventually drop out. Serve on the board, or reflip it onto a serving platter, and serve with a cup or more of warm sauce heaped on the top or served on the side.

    Note: If you want to prepare the pasticciata and bake later the same or the next day, do not sprinkle the cheese on top. Cover it, wrap it well, and refrigerate. Before baking, sprinkle on the cheeses and make a tent of foil over the baking dish, without touching the cheese. Poke a few small holes in the foil, to vent steam. Set the pan on a sheet, and bake for 1/2 hour at 400° F; then remove the foil and continue to bake until deeply colored and crusted.

    To Freeze: When assembling and layering the polenta, instead of using one big dish, do it in 2-3 smaller dishes, seal the ones you want to freeze, label and date, and when you are ready to use, defrost and bake according to recipe.

    Excerpted from Lidia's Favorite Recipes by Lidia Bastianich. Copyright © 2012 by Tutti a Tavola, LLC. Excerpted by permission of Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

    More Make-Ahead Recipes

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      Huevos Rancheros Spaghetti Recipe
      Melissa d'Arabian, host of the Food Network show Ten Dollar Dinners, offers a dinner-friendly variation on the Mexican breakfast dish huevos rancheros: she substitutes spaghetti for the usual tortillas. When serving, break the egg yolk and mix it into the salsa for a silken pasta sauce that's light, fresh—and wholly original.
      Huevos Rancheros Spaghetti
      Photo: Gentl & Hyers

      Serves 4

      Ingredients

      • 12 ounces spaghetti
      • 1 1/2 cups frozen corn
      • 1 1/2 cups canned black beans, rinsed and drained
      • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
      • 4 eggs
      • Kosher salt
      • Ground black pepper
      • 1 1/2 cups salsa, plus more for garnish
      • 3/4 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
      • 1/2 cup chopped green onion (optional)

      Directions


      Total time: 20 minutes

      In a large pot, bring salted water to boil and cook spaghetti according to package instructions. In the last 3 minutes of cooking, add corn and black beans.

      Meanwhile, heat oil in a pan and fry eggs, in batches if needed. Season with salt and pepper.

      When spaghetti is finished cooking, reserve a cup of the pasta water. Drain spaghetti, beans, and corn, returning the mixture to the pot. Add salsa and 3/4 cup pasta water, tossing to coat. Add more pasta water if needed. Divide pasta onto 4 serving plates and place a hot fried egg and 3 Tbsp. Cheddar on each. Garnish with additional salsa and green onion, if using. Serve immediately.

      More Creative Pasta Recipes

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        Chef Curtis Stone's Takeout Intervention
        Chef Curtis Stone stages a takeout intervention for Matt and Melissa.
        Imagine if one of the top chefs in the country came knocking at your door and offered to teach you how to make your favorite meals. This is exactly what happened to Melissa and Matt, parents from Ashburn, Virginia, who spend up to $400 a week on food delivery and takeout.

        Oprah Show producers dispatch Curtis Stone, the Australian host of TLC's Take Home Chef and a sandwich showdown competitor, to Melissa and Matt's home to stage a takeout intervention.

        For years, Melissa says she spent hours making meals no one liked. Matt says they order out six—sometimes seven—nights a week.

        With Curtis's help, that's all about to change!
        PAGE 1 of 6
        FROM: Celebrity Chefs Move In with Viewer Families
        Published on March 11, 2009

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          Wendell's "What to Wear?" — The Right Way to Rough It in the Woods

          Wendell
          Hey there all you Raising Whitley modern-day campers!

          As you can tell by now I am the hat king! I love all types of hats and I have one for every occasion—just like the girls love their wigs, I love my hats!

          When I escorted Kym to her eye appointment, I chose to sport my black hat. If you have a lot of hair these are the types of hats that will accommodate your crown and glory. You want to choose a color that will not be too bright for a girl that is going to really see you for who you are after this surgery.

          Now, when taking the kids on a camping trip you always want to wear bright colors for two reasons: One, so the child can easily find you in the woods, and the other is to scare off the lions, tigers and bears (oh my!)



          I say when camping in the woods take all of your essentials and maintain your look at all times—who knows whom you might meet, possibly a date, out there in the wild blue yonder. I think it's better to have a onesie (okay, animal print onesie) to blend in with nature. Don't forget matching slippers if you must take shoes.



          As a modern day camper, it is important to have all the comforts of home, so that means a Fabbbbb pillow and if I must sleep outside then I need to bring the hotel art deco look to the outside. Beware, as your fellow campers will try to read you, but at the same time they will want to use some of your fabulous stuff.

          And, no, I have never owned a sleeping bag so I just improvised and used my sturdy luggage—okay, okay, so it just happened to be designer. When cooking in the woods all you need is one skillet, that's all we had back in the day growing up, we did not have a set of pots and pans and we turned out an entire meal in one pot and or skillet, so I thought I would show these guys who acts like they don't know how to ruff it in the woods. HAPPY CAMPING KIDS.

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            Eight Products to Keep Your Home Clutter-Free
            Staying organized doesn't need to cost you a lot of money. These simple products will pay for themselves over and over again in terms of the time and effort you'll save keeping your home organized.
            checklist
            Clear bins with lockable lids: Blankets, off-season clothes, art supplies, cosmetics...you name it! These organizing staples are key to staying organized and protecting your things from dust and dirt.

            Trash bags: Obviously, you'll need these to declutter your space. Use them for the Trash Bag Tango. Grab two bags, and take 10 minutes every day for a week to fill one with trash and the other with items you can donate.

            See the trash bag tango in action Watch

            A Hamper: Are dirty clothes on the floor part of your vision for the bedroom? Probably not. Get a hamper to collect dirty clothes. That way, they're all in one place when it's time for laundry.

            Hangers. Without enough hangers, your clean clothes will fall to the floor (and get mixed with dirty ones if you don't have a hamper). Hanging up clothes does more than keep them off the floor. If you hang all of them in one direction and switch each hanger as you wear that item, you can track what you're really wearing and donate the rest.

            Roomy open bins: These are great for easily storing things like toys and sporting equipment. Make sure it's big enough to hold what you need. If it starts to overflow, sort through what's in there and get rid of what you don't need.

            A good filing system: Get a stable, well-made filing cabinet and consider one of the commercially available systems like File Solutions or Freedom Filer to help keep paperwork in order by providing pre-labeled files that cover every aspect of home operation imaginable.

            Your computer: Is your desk overflowing with bills? Are you running out of room for your CDs? Your computer can be an important organizational tool. Pay bills online to eliminate unneeded paper and transfer your CDs to a computer to give yourself more room.

            Label makers: These are essential tools for marking what you've worked so hard to put away. Use them all over the house, especially in the garage, where it's easy for the boxes to start piling up.

            Now that you have the supplies, practice these quick and easy ways to keep your home organized.

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