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6 Miraculously Simple Recipes from Ina Garten's New Cookbook
Ina Garten, TV's beloved Barefoot Contessa, shares recipes from her new cookbook, Barefoot Contessa Foolproof: Recipes You Can Trust.
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ina garten's seared scallops recipe

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Seared Scallops and Potato-Celery Root Puree
Scallops are packed either wet or dry. Wet ones last longer and are good for soups and chowder, but they won't sear; find dry ones for this recipe. Grapeseed oil has a higher burning temperature than most oils, so I use it to avoid scorching the scallops.

Get the recipe for Seared Scallops and Potato-Celery Root Puree

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    What I Learned from Cooking with Ina Garten for a Day
    Ina Garten, TV's beloved Barefoot Contessa, invites one very lucky amateur cook into her home—and then puts her to work.
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    Photo: William Abranowicz

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    It's one thing to see Ina Garten blanching green beans on television, or beaming from the covers of her best-selling cookbooks. It's a very different thing to see her here, at her home in East Hampton, New York—or rather, in the vast, sunlit structure next door, which she calls the barn and which smells like fresh laundry and homemade bread. That is to say, it's a much, much cooler thing. The legions of cuisine hounds who ring in Saturday mornings with Barefoot Contessa, Ina's delightfully unfussy cooking show on the Food Network, have watched her whip up a whole host of delicious things inside this barn, from white-chocolate almond bark to chicken roasted with 40 cloves of garlic. But they haven't seen her do so in slippers.

    I've come to Ina's inner sanctum to learn more about her unusual recipe-testing process, which she's explaining to me in the barn's kitchen—an airy space anchored by an 18-foot, marble-topped island, two tidy refrigerators, and a dining table that could seat a royal court. "I work on a recipe until it's exactly what I'm envisioning," Ina says. "Sometimes I nail it on the second try, and sometimes it takes 25. But once I feel it's right, I give the recipe to my assistant and have her make the dish. She's not a trained cook, so as she works I watch to see what mistakes she makes. It helps me recognize all those little instructions I forgot to make clear—like 'Cook on high heat' or 'Chop diagonally.'"

    It is my great privilege to temporarily take the place of her assistant today, becoming, for a few exhilarating hours, Ina's culinary guinea pig. I'm relieved to learn that the cookbook from which most of today's dishes are taken—Ina's eighth, it hits stores in October—is called Barefoot Contessa Foolproof: Recipes You Can Trust. Her food has always been both miraculously simple and stunningly sophisticated, which is a line most chefs find difficult to walk. But this latest volume is designed to take both the ease and the elegance of her food to a whole new level. And thank goodness for that: As I explain to Ina, I'm a serviceable cook and an eager eater, but I lack the finesse, assuredness, and, to be frank, the attention span to really prepare things properly. In short, I tell her, "I love food, but I'm lazy."
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      The 6 Fastest Italian Dinners on the Planet
      These simple recipes for classic meals let you have a home-cooked Sunday dinner on a busy Wednesday night.
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      Lasagna

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      The No-Bake Lasagna
      Mario Batali's no-layering, no-stress dish treats lasagna noodles the same as any other pasta. The chef boils the sheets until they're al dente and then tosses them with a five-minute tomato sauce flavored with olive paste (which you can buy or easily make) and pitted green olives.

      Get the recipe: Not-Baked Lasagne

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        6 Simple Italian Dinners Anyone Can Make
        These recipes for lasagna, pizza, pasta, meatballs and more classics are so easy, you can prepare them any night of the week.
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        Lasagna
        The No-Noodle Lasagna
        Frozen ravioli and jarred spaghetti sauce are the secrets to this cheater's version of the ultimate Italian-American casserole. Although this recipe makes mini lasagne, which are perfect for a party, you can also use an 8-by-8-inch baking dish and serve the meal family style. Start by spreading sauce on the bottom and then cover it with a layer of ravioli, followed by the ricotta mix, mozzarella and more sauce. Repeat until you're out of ingredients, and bake until bubbly.

        Get the recipe: Ravioli Lasagna

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          Fillet of Beef Bourguignon
          Adapted from The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook by Ina Garten (Clarkson Potter), this dish is excellent made in advance and refrigerated in the pan. When you are ready to serve, warm fillets and sauce over low heat 10 to 15 minutes, until heated through.
          Fillet of Beef Bourguignon
          Created by Ina Garten

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          Servings: Serves 6–8
          Ingredients
          • 3 pounds beef fillet , trimmed
          • Salt and freshly ground pepper
          • 3 to 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive extra-virgin olive oil
          • 1/4 pound bacon , chopped
          • 2 cloves garlic , minced
          • 1 1/2 cups good dry red good dry red wine , such as a burgundy or Chianti
          • 2 cups beef beef stock
          • 1 tablespoon tomato tomato paste
          • 1 sprig fresh fresh thyme
          • 1/2 pound pearl pearl onions , peeled
          • 8 to 10 carrots , cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces
          • 3 tablespoons unsalted unsalted butter , softened
          • 2 tablespoons all-purpose all-purpose flour
          • 1/2 pound mushrooms (cultivated or wild), sliced 1/4 inch thick
          Directions
          Using a sharp knife, cut fillet crosswise into 1-inch-thick slices (for about 8 fillets). Season each piece with 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper on both sides. In a large heavy-bottom pan over medium-high heat, sauté fillets in batches with 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil, until browned outside and very rare inside, about 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Remove fillets from pan and set aside on a platter.

          In the same pan, sauté bacon over medium-low heat 5 minutes, until browned and crisp. Remove bacon and set aside. Drain all but 2 tablespoons of fat from pan. Add garlic and cook 30 seconds.

          Deglaze pan with red wine and cook on high heat 1 minute, scraping pan bottom. Add beef stock, tomato paste and thyme; season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and cook over medium-high heat 10 minutes. Strain sauce and return to pan. Add onions and carrots and simmer 20 to 30 minutes, until sauce is reduced and vegetables are cooked.

          In a small bowl, mash 2 tablespoons butter and flour into a paste using a fork, then whisk gently into sauce in pan. Simmer 2 minutes to thicken.

          Meanwhile, over medium heat, sauté mushrooms separately in 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon olive oil about 10 minutes, until browned and tender.

          Add beef slices, mushrooms and cooked bacon to pan with vegetables and sauce. Cover and reheat gently, 5 to 10 minutes. If the mixture doesn't have enough liquid, add more red wine. Season to taste and serve immediately.

          Recommended technique: To peel onions easily, first blanch one to two minutes in boiling water.

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