Spatchcock chicken

Photo: Thinkstock

1 of 3
Spatch-what?
If you're stuck in a rut of boneless, skinless chicken-breast dinners, we've got one word for you (and don't laugh): Spatchcock. It's a funny name for an old-fashioned technique used to prepare poultry, also known as butterflying, in which you cut out the backbone and open the chicken like a book, so it lies flat. A foolproof way to roast or grill a whole chicken, spatchcocking also protects the meat from drying out (you don't have to worry about some parts being closer to the heat source than others). And it's great for cooks on a budget, since you pay less per pound when buying a whole chicken versus buying a bird cut into eight or 10 pieces. Spatchcocked chicken roasts in nearly half the time it takes to roast a whole chicken, says Melissa Clark in The New York Times. And it's not difficult—we promise.
PREVIOUS | NEXT

NEXT STORY

Comment

LONG FORM
ONE WORD