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Foods That Make You Feel Full
Try these delicious, healthy foods to curb your appetite at mealtimes and throughout the day.
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Salmon
Do you always feel unsatisfied, even after a full meal? This may have something to do with triglycerides, which are the fat molecules in your blood. Studies suggest that high levels of triglycerides may block the hormone that signals your brain to feel full. That means more food—and potentially, more weight gain. This grocery list provides some great mealtime options to help lower your triglyceride levels and help you control your hunger levels.

Salmon

The high concentration of protein and omega-3s in fatty fish, like salmon, has been shown to help lower your triglycerides and fight hunger.

How to eat it: To reap its health benefits, aim to eat a minimum of three ounces of canned salmon or fresh wild salmon per day at least twice a week.

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    Eight Ways to Curb Your Appetite
    Eight Ways to Curb Your Appetite
    When you strip down any diet to its most basic elements, they all have two things in common: exercising more and eating less.

    Take your mind off hunger with Bob's techniques.
    FROM: Bob Greene's Best Life Diet
    Published on January 01, 2006
    As a reminder, always consult your doctor for medical advice and treatment before starting any program.

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      The Best and Worst Foods for Weight Loss
      Bob Greene
      When starting a weight loss program, tossing out the bad-for-you foods in your kitchen and restocking with good-for-you alternatives can help you eliminate some dieting pitfalls. Janice Jibrin is a registered dietitian and the lead nutritionist for Bob's Best Life Diet. Bob talks with Janice about foods that will help you lose weight and the foods that could derail your plan.

      Here is what Janice says you should watch out for in your kitchen:
      • Trans fat and saturated fat: Reduce foods high in saturated fats and eliminate any foods with trans-fats.
      • Simple sugars: Table sugar and items made with high-fructose corn syrup fall under the label of simple sugars. Janice says they should be consumed in moderation.
      • Sodium: Reduce your use of the salt shaker. Janice says sodium is found in most prepackaged foods and is very addictive. She recommends keeping your daily intake at 2300 milligrams.
      • White flour: Janice says white flour has been stripped of important nutrients and is full of empty calories.
      • Soda: Eliminate soda from your diet, Janice says.

      Here is what Janice says should be in your kitchen:
      • Whole grains: Bread and pasta made with whole grains are full of nutrients. Janice says you should transition all your white flour foods to whole grain products.
      • Fruits and vegetables: Fruits and vegetables are your friends! "One way you can fill up your stomach with fewer calories is to eat a lot of vegetables," Janice says. "Take a look at your plate, and every meal, half of the plate should be vegetables."
      • Olive oil, canola oil, nuts and avocados: These are good fats that Janice says you should incorporate into daily meals.
      • Protein: Janice says any kind of poultry without skin is a good choice of protein. Fish, soy and lean cuts of beef are good choices, too.
      • Vegetarian foods: A few times a week, Janice says you should eat a vegetarian meal, incorporating foods like tofu and hummus into your diet.
      • A daily 150-calorie snack of your choice: "It lets off steam and you don't feel like you are under this diet [and] that you will never have any fun the rest of your life," Janice says.

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        Power Snacking
        Power snacking
        We live in a super-sized food nation. Twenty years ago, a bagel weighed about two ounces and had less than 200 calories. Today, a typical bagel has doubled in size and calories.

        Used the right way, snacking can be an effective way to curb cravings and improve your weight loss efforts.

        Regular snacking staves off extreme hunger, maintains energy and actually helps you shed pounds. The key to healthy snacking, though, is knowing when and what to munch. Aim for one to two 150- to 200-calorie snacks daily. Make sure to space meals and snacks about three to four hours apart. A well-rounded healthy snack includes protein, carbohydrates and some fat. This mix keeps you satisfied longer than pure carbohydrate snacks and also helps to balance blood sugar levels. Here are some perfectly balanced snacks, all under 200 calories:
        • Maple-Nut Yogurt: Stir 1 teaspoon maple syrup and 1 tablespoon walnut pieces into 6 ounces (or 3/4 cup) low-fat plain yogurt.
        • 3/4 cup high-fiber cereal of your choice with 1 cup nonfat milk
        • Mix 3 tablespoons plain low-fat yogurt with freshly chopped parsley. Dip 8 baby carrots in yogurt and eat with 5 woven wheat crackers.
        • 3/4 cup vanilla soymilk with half an apple spread with 1 teaspoon peanut butter
        • Blend 1 cup nonfat milk with 1/2 cup unsweetened frozen raspberries and 1/2 cup blackberries into a smoothie.
        • 1 cup skim latte and 1 unfrosted or undipped biscotti
        • 1 string mozzarella cheese stick and 1 whole orange
        • Raspberry ricotta: Combine 1/3 cup part-skim ricotta cheese with 1/2 cup raspberries and 2 teaspoons raspberry jam.

        Dayna Winter is a registered dietitian and food and nutrition writer in New York City.
        FROM: Bob Greene's Best Life Diet
        Published on January 01, 2006
        As a reminder, always consult your doctor for medical advice and treatment before starting any program.

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          Best Life Diet Basics
          Power snacking
          Power Snacking
          A dietitian says snacking can be an effective way to curb cravings and improve your weight loss efforts.

          But are you snacking the right way?

          Sizing It Up
          No wonder our bellies are bursting! Look at the explosion in portion sizes over the last 20 years.

          See what "a serving" really looks like.

          Three Big Questions
          Before you tackle weight loss, you have to wrap your head around it. Answer the "whys" and begin changing your life!

          Ask yourself the Big Three now.

          Top Food Mistakes
          Not every label is as healthy as it sounds. Make a difference in your diet with Bob's smarter moves.

          Make better food choices.
          FROM: Bob Greene's Best Life Diet
          Published on January 01, 2006
          As a reminder, always consult your doctor for medical advice and treatment before starting any program.

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            Healthy Children, Healthy Planet
            What your children eat could be contributing to a host of health and behavioral problems. Chef Aine McAteer explores this connection and offers tips to get your children to eat—and love!—healthier foods.
            Child eating apple
            Photo: Ableimages/Thinkstock
            I personally haven't given birth to children, but being the third in a family of 11, I certainly got an opportunity to practice some motherly duties whilst a mere child myself.

            Many of my clients have children, and it's always a thrill for me when I can get them not only to eat their veggies, but coming back for more. One of my clever kid clients would make a deal with me that she'll eat her veggies if I eat a Big Mac—she got me there!

            I had one cooking assignment for a family in Spain whose 6-year-old son was having some behavioral problems and difficulty concentrating in school. Some tests revealed he was allergic to wheat, dairy products, sugar and tomatoes—ingredients that are staples in almost every child's diet.

            What's a parent to do when faced with such a dilemma? Unfortunately, flying in a personal chef for your 6-year-old is not an option for most parents. After a month on his new diet, the child's transformation was dramatic. He became much calmer, and his teachers noted he was focused and paying attention in class—they were so impressed that they started to include healthier options for the other children in the school.

            This child is not an exception. Many of the foods that are staples for children are at the root of a host of health and behavioral issues. The question is what to do about it and how to get children not only to tolerate healthy foods, but to want to eat them.

            Get 9 tips to help your children eat healthier
            PAGE 1 of 2

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